The Trump Bump

This is not a post about politics but a play on current events. Really, I just want to interest readers in The God’s Cycle. The setting of these six books is actually 35 years ago–or 190, if you count The 1808 Monster on the sidebar (available everywhere, print or e.). In the U.S. America, time is now right to capture attention for rural qualities. These books are full of what it’s like to live here now, not just 35 or 190 years ago. (Although the population has grown through influx.) Some industry has gone from Maine, wood-turning, shoe-making and textiles for instance; and much of the paper-making. The only other thing missing in the early-mid 1980s (or 1808) setting is the device in your hand — or otherwise at your fingertips. Maybe our fancy doesn’t need that gadget appearing during the invisible imaginative experience?

These books are sold individually or together in one volume.  They are on the Amazon author’s page (sidebar link below) and elsewhere–full of community, character, mountains rivers woodlands diners and the I.I.C.E. (International Institute of Coordinated Experiments). Also love, loggers, mechanics,  paper and pulp mills, uncanny animal critters, and hell.

What’s not to like?

 

writerly

Here is a bit of off-topic bookness, unrelated to Maine. First, I’ve been glad of a posting at The Fellowship of The King, entitled: The Hitch in Readying to Meet…

The genesis of this slice of the Afterlife was a mythgard.org fundraising flash fiction contest. The entry needed work.  In fact it still does, but I’m very happy it was received as is at TFOTK. The editor chose a wonderful sort of reverse situation image to illustrate.

The next piece of news is about the SF alternate universe novel SiXPointz HiTopOLis. This was hard to write and I asked editing help from Scribblerworks   She’s an excellent editor if not totally timely. I used her to great benefit on Fantastic Travelogue. SiXPointz has been available at online venues in softcover, but now I’ve complied it as an ebook through Smashwords.  Smashwords is good for ebooking, as I was informed on the Tor blog by one of Tor’s authors.  They ship to all digital-book venues but Amazon. You have to do Amazon individually.

Finally on off-topic writerly, I’ve done some editing on Five Points Akropolis, in all three formats, hardcover, softcover and ebook. When the first Five Points Akropolis was about to come out a few years back, a virtual friend (also a Tor author) pointed out a couple problem spots on the first page! This was prompt enough to reread and tweak the whole book for debut. But now it’s tweaked again. It’s the same story but reads better, especially the character of the Grandmaster. And I set the 2016 copyright, in addition to the earlier date, on the copyright info page. It’s not available for distribution in paper yet but should be shortly, as it’s been approved.

 

Five Dun Herrings

one of many royal apartments

one of many royal apartments

 

At Mythgard they are in the midst of fundraising and, for bit of funding fun, have instigated “Almost an Inkling” flash fiction contests. There’s still time to enter the last two contests, this week’s being poetry, and next week is the speculate and sub-create contest. Each of these micro fiction contests has its own specific word limits. We’ve had Portals, Dragons, and Minute Mysteries. 

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Maine in The Princess Bride

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In preparing for Mythgard Academy’s engaging interactive lectures, the first thing I noticed about The Princess Bride was its intriguing frame. I was taken in both by the frame and the fantasy novel’s conceit that it was based on an early 20th-century story which was itself based on older versions of the text. Apparently William Goldman and the author S. Morgenstern were treating this old tale, in part, as satire. I wanted to know: was this a shame?  Was it all real, a guess, a farce?

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diary of a robot

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Thinking out loud here at The Green and Blue House … I’m looking for ways to get my science-fiction reading into Maine blogging.   Something like the fact of a science-fiction character hailing for Maine, USA.  I’m not talking about my own science fiction. This is a Diary of a Robot, SF by TM-2000 and TLC’s hack Lewis Jenkins. The Maine character (appropriately named Eddie Forest for my Maine tie-in) has served in the Army (as does many a Mainer), and has moved around enough to lose his Maine way of speaking. His is a definite supporting role.  As comptroller of TLC, he supports his old Army buddy, the inventor of a testing machine that is boot-strapping its encoded intelligence to the level of a truly coherent  thinking machine.

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transport from Maine to heaven

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How is one conveyed from hell—or from earth—to the celestial city—in literature?  How are characters transported to heaven from, say, a dim, empty-seeming, labyrinthine town?  And (since this is a Maine-dedicated weblog), how would a mill-worker get to heaven from the wooded mountains of Maine?  Spun off an open invitation to blog about C.S. Lewis’s The Great Divorce, this post seeks a route on which Maine might join up with CSL’s great bus ride.

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