chapter 27, literary lessons

“Now I must either bundle it back in to my tin kitchen to mold, pay for printing it myself, or chop it up to suit purchasers and get what I can for it. Fame is a very good thing to have in the house, but cash is more convenient, so I wish to take the sense of the meeting on this important subject,” said Jo, calling a family council.

where Little Women was written, 1941 image (wiki)

“Don’t spoil your book, my girl, for there is more in it than you know, and the idea is well worked out. Let it wait and ripen,” was her father’s advice, and he practiced what he preached, having waited patiently thirty years for fruit of his own to ripen, and being in no haste to gather it even now when it was sweet and mellow.

“It seems to me that Jo will profit more by taking the trial than by waiting,” said Mrs. March. “Criticism is the best test of such work, for it will show her both unsuspected merits and faults, and help her to do better next time. We are too partial, but the praise and blame of outsiders will prove useful, even if she gets but little money.”

“Yes,” said Jo, knitting her brows, “that’s just it. I’ve been fussing over the thing so long, I really don’t know whether it’s good, bad, or indifferent. It will be a great help to have cool, impartial persons take a look at it, and tell me what they think of it.”

 

Continue reading

Maine car-lovers rejoice!

Got a glimpse of a report—so, the headline really—about Maine being among the most car-friendly states in the Union. I was surprised. This is not normally what we think of here in Maine. Would you think Maine, with an estimated population of 1,331,479 and an area of 35,385 square miles could hold its own in a group where surely—what’s the name of that hectic state? —SoCal, with a population of 22,680,010, and an area of 56,512.35 sq. mi. is likely car-lover number one?

Still cruising the web for facts on it all, I got to thinking of goodies coming for us Maine car-lovers, including pavement.

Continue reading

on satire

terry lindvall’s mirror

Am adding a new satire tag to the green and blue house. Satire is needed to season an essay collection so I thought practicing here might help this arduous laborious unwelcome difficult endeavor. I’ve had the FUN tag include satire but now, with the new tag, the crafting of satire might be encouraged.

I’ve written elsewhere that satire is tricky and can be misleadingly deceptive: If it’s too dry it can be seen by some as straightforwardly serious, not satire. So the writer has to label it, then reader and writer both suffer complete devastation.  Come right out in the style: yes this is satire! To be effective in our culture it must be close to the edge, even crazy, extreme. Then every type of intellect can recognize it as satire. We should be able to say this is satire, yes, and what does this particular piece of satire mean?

Continue reading

On the Other Hand…

Let’s everybody pick up stakes and go back to the place of our birth so’s we can be taxed and counted by Caes— by the government. There’ll be so many trains planes steamers—uh diesels—and automobiles moving over land sea and air that the angels will have a hard time keeping track of it all. (This presumes that universal physical laws and materiality are charged to great disciplined beings continually moving to carry out their respective stewardship.)

Continue reading

danger: local humor

Hardy

The 302 Tavern greeter

 

Contrary to appearances, this post will likely not make me laugh. I apologize to myself for this. Sadly, I could use some laughter right now, but am uncertain how to order it up. Especially without pen in hand. Certainly reading Surprised by Laughter by author Terry Lindvall does not bring it on. I know—gruesome, is it not? I guess, like any old Mainer, I will have to make do with whatever comes to hand, even laughter’s opposite. (What would that be?) Notice, I did not say I was an old Mainer. Old, however, yes.

one form of dictation

penless. one form of dictation

Continue reading

Maine seasons and cycles

R. breaks trail

R. breaks the icy trail

In Maine we say there are only two seasons (technically) — winter and July. I hear it’s that way in Canada (only more adherent). Winter this year held off extreme threatening cold until the last two days, -10°F, -23 Celsius, and keeping the woodstove going all night, leaving the cellar door open: The back-up heater in our basement quit but the waterpipes are still intact. We’ve got other seasons in some parts: ski season for instance. Also mud season and bug season (two separate parts of the calendar spring).

Continue reading

snow-making

My second memory is of snow-making. It was dark. We were in the stairway. Hands of giants were dressing me in heavy clothing as my big brother (two years older) was telling me about this wonderful white cold flaky stuff that fell from the sky. God made this white cold flaky stuff, he said. My brother was very excited, telling me about masses of delicate little pieces of webwork falling and falling, and that this was its own (new to me) particular season. He went into a long and deep analysis of how God accomplished this:

The band of precipitation that is associated with a warm front is often extensive, forced by weak upward vertical motion of air over the frontal boundary, which condenses as it cools off and produces snowfall within an elongated band, which is wide and stratiform, meaning falling out of nimbostratus clouds.

Continue reading

Five Dun Herrings

one of many royal apartments

one of many royal apartments

 

At Mythgard they are in the midst of fundraising and, for bit of funding fun, have instigated “Almost an Inkling” flash fiction contests. There’s still time to enter the last two contests, this week’s being poetry, and next week is the speculate and sub-create contest. Each of these micro fiction contests has its own specific word limits. We’ve had Portals, Dragons, and Minute Mysteries. 

Continue reading

Maine in The Princess Bride

800px-Stephenking_house

In preparing for Mythgard Academy’s engaging interactive lectures, the first thing I noticed about The Princess Bride was its intriguing frame. I was taken in both by the frame and the fantasy novel’s conceit that it was based on an early 20th-century story which was itself based on older versions of the text. Apparently William Goldman and the author S. Morgenstern were treating this old tale, in part, as satire. I wanted to know: was this a shame?  Was it all real, a guess, a farce?

Continue reading

Fellowship & Fairydust

Inspiring Faith and Creativity and Exploring the Arts through a Spiritual Lens.

Rough fish in the river

Appreciating all the river has to offer

Planet Pailly

Where Science Meets Fiction

Prairie Yesteryear

Heritage Notes from the Prairie States

Andrea Lundgren

Book Coaching, Reviews, and Writing Tips

New England Nomad

All Things New England

Off the Shelf

Blog of the Marion E. Wade Center

Book Geeks Anonymous

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

Letters from the Edge of Elfland

entering the Maine metaphor

Wisdom from The Lord of the Rings

A weekly blog exploring the wisdom of The Lord of the Rings

the traveller's path

The blog of L.A. Smith, writer

The Fellowship of The King

Literary Expressions of Catholic Homeschoolers and Homeschool Graduates

sartorias

A topnotch WordPress.com site

asakiyume mita

A topnotch WordPress.com site