visiting the eastern uplands

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double-click to enlarge and read the fine print!

 

The embarrassing admission:

The editor in charge of cover text asked for a back-of-the-book description to surmount its blurb by Jake Meador.  I chose part of something from the book I particularly liked—heavily influenced by Annie Dillard. By JRR Tolkien. In the way of metaphoric memoir, the description was written in first person.  The editor’s reply? It must be third-person description. Being low energy, I gave them what you see in this cover image. And …I just wanted that passage! Here is the original unedited from inside the book:

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On the Other Hand…

Let’s everybody pick up stakes and go back to the place of our birth so’s we can be taxed and counted by Caes— by the government. There’ll be so many trains planes steamers—uh diesels—and automobiles moving over land sea and air that the angels will have a hard time keeping track of it all. (This presumes that universal physical laws and materiality are charged to great disciplined beings continually moving to carry out their respective stewardship.)

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“the oxford” part two

The earliest post in this three-part series is Mexico, Maine. If you missed the second part, see the recent  post on this book.

monica-wood

In the memoir of her childhood Monica Wood tells us the heroic, founding industrialist story of Mr. Hugh Chisholm and his surreptitious study—or scoping out as rurals say here—of the great falls and surrounding land. The lens is her schoolroom instruction by Sister Ernestine. Chisholm’s borrowed horse and sleigh took him down-river through icy fog where the thundering of the waterfall in rime-frosted landscape excited this man as he approached. He then climbed out to pat his St. Jude, and reward the horse with a cube of sugar.

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“the oxford”

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archives of the rumford historical society when the mill was handsome

 

Monica Wood’s memoir centers around the sudden death of her father on his way to work in Mexico, Maine as his children are readying for school. In When We Were the Kennedys experiences of a literary child in 1963 assume imaginative life in the reader. By literary child I mean one who loves reading. For unwitting consolation Monica turns to Anne of Green Gables, Little Women, and then discovers Nancy Drew. Writing mysteries herself, she becomes Nancy Drew. She is mystified by her own story, The mystery of the  missing man. After closing the book, I was reluctant to leave this child Monica behind.

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