B. Pond

treasuries chambers

the view from swan’s ledge

 

Yes, am continuing to re-read We Took to the Woods by Louise Dickinson Rich. It’s still propped up on the kitchen table. I’m not sure I want the book to end… just yet anyway. I’d like to quote her on her experience with “B Pond,” because it shows that facet of this book which I may not have well expressed in the earlier post. I’ve never seen B. Pond. I’d like to–ever since first seeing that name on the map. Rich experiences enchanted days, her reward for persisting in this enchanted visit to B Pond, year after year. She loves this pond. And I can identify with that in my own Maine experience.

 

I used to go up and sit on Swan’s Ledge and look out over the valley of the ponds. I might have a snack with me, or even lunch. And often my notebook was there. Over the weekend I was going to try to take photographs in the heights somewhere to replicate, just a bit, her experience with B Pond. One place in particular, decades ago, would send thrills through me, looking out on this exquisite small round Indian Pond from that ledge high above it: Sunk in the green hills, that’s how we saw it long ago. We tried to go back there this weekend in look at it from the height, but it had been bought and a camp put in up the trail, the owners of which had let shrubs and trees grow up out of the ledge, overwhelming the view I wanted to share with you.

looking up from the crossword puzzles

 

So I drove around with R. looking for other such views to share and found similar view-conquering transitions. I thought about those earlier note-taking and sketching visits, and decided to take out one my old drawings, pin it to a tree, and share it here. I transplanted this yellow birch from the woods when it was 2.5-foot tall.

So that’s what I’ve done.

Louise Dickinson Rich:

“Let me tell you about the best trip we ever made to B Pond. Some days are enchanted, as everybody knows. Every detail of the day, even the most trivial, falls into exquisite juxtaposition with the next. Commonplace things take on significance in beauty. Perhaps it’s a matter of timing. Perhaps for once one walks in sympathetic vibration with the earth, disturbing nothing as one treads. However that may be, this was one of those days.”

She goes on to share this truly exquisite day in her companionship with a friend. It’s wonderful, wonderfully expressed in her chapter “Do You Get out Very Often?” If you get a chance to read this wonderful book, maybe buy, or through interlibrary loan, give it a try. The whole is wonderful. It will give you a chance to get out of the city or village or town. To feel what it’s like to live in the middle of woodlands. Where very few people live.

treasuries chambers vertical

One response

  1. Sounds like a wonderful book to read in the summer….I’ll see if I can track it down. Love your drawing too! Too bad you couldn’t find your “old” view but I guess you got to find some new ones, so that’s a bit of recompense!

    Liked by 1 person

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