Maine seasons and cycles

R. breaks trail

R. breaks the icy trail

In Maine we say there are only two seasons (technically) — winter and July. I hear it’s that way in Canada (only more adherent). Winter this year held off extreme threatening cold until the last two days, -10°F, -23 Celsius, and keeping the woodstove going all night, leaving the cellar door open: The back-up heater in our basement quit but the waterpipes are still intact. We’ve got other seasons in some parts: ski season for instance. Also mud season and bug season (two separate parts of the calendar spring).

 

As do others, we have these things called cycles. The election cycle is an example of a cycle. Generally I don’t mess about with politics. Let’s see. There are Democrats…. who are they again? I think they have presidential candidates this year? There are Republicans. There’s one called Trump, right? He does not look First Nation to me. Wonder where his parents came from?

Another cycle in Maine is The God’s Cycle. I know a little bit about this one. It has a hero named Balder Simon. He is not First Nation, either, although his son was. On the other hand, being of immigrant stock, Norwegian, his ancestors, as I think he claimed, may have been Vikings who actually did settle for a time in parts of Maine — when it was called Vineland. (On account of the grapevines.)

Possibly Mr. Trump… well he is of Viking stock? I don’t know but hasn’t he that look? I’m so politically incorrect! But the Vikings — weren’t they a kind and benevolent people, interested in serving others, not themselves, in stewardship during their colonizations?

All this is just guessing, speculation I’m doing especially for this entry. I guess Maine needs a good Republican Commissioner of Education, because our current governor, Mr. LePage — former manager of Marden’s Surplus and Salvage — is on it. In transforming the formerly evil practice of cronyism to exceptional and benevolent heights, the governor has recently promoted himself to the Commissioner of Education position. Stewardship is very important to Republicans. (I would like to see our local Marden’s resume selling remaindered books!—hint.)

I was born into a solid Republican family and taught to be a responsible citizen. Now I’m writing this post in hopes of being a responsible immigrant descendent (and to stop my parents from tossing in their graves).

The God’s Cycle’s blond hero, Balder Simon, was a Vietnam veteran, who was pitched into hell by accident. Or I may be misremembering the story. He may have fallen in, he may have volunteered, or was it all just a mistake? He may have taken a boat. I’d better reread that part. It’s wise not to take chances with heroes. You want to make certain of them.

Then there are the religious cycles in which people planet-side partake.  (I promise not to go into the Maine aspect of water, rock, or solar magnetic cycles). For Lent in, my particular religion, I’ve decided to give up the ever enriching web-cycling in which I visit weblogs of people whose thoughts and writings I like. But I’ll be back after Easter! (I’m also giving up munching nuts which I and my neighboring chipmunks so enjoy.) But I won’t give up posting during this part of the religious cycle because I’m told I need a “platform” of some sort, and this is solely it. (The scare quotes are intentional.)

ron breaking trail

catching up to my trail-breaker

Many prefer July to winter. I lean that way, especially at 10 below, Fahrenheit, but even sometimes in mud season. Mud season is part of the cycle of seasons. We have also these things called bicycles. I’m looking forward to biking season. There may be mud, but not ice or freezing rain.

 

balder's wilderness

balder’s wilderness, last part of The God’s Cycle

 

8 responses

  1. Haha, this made me laugh so many times! No, Mr. Trump does not look First Nations, and it would be great if your Commissioner of Education’s concept of stewardship extended to selling remaindered books 🙂

    It’s wise not to take chances with heroes. TRUTH!

    Well, I hope your Lent is fruitful (we had a handout in church with that title: Make Your Lent Fruitful). With your red cap on (is that you? I guess I should specify the you since this is a team blog. I’m writing to the S member of the team but the picture looks more like the R member, so perhaps the author of this post is the R member? So let me rephrase) With the red cap, the snowshoer in this picture looks a bit like a woodpecker, and if you think of it, writers are woodpeckers of sorts, if you think of a keyboard as like a typewriter and a typewriter as like a bill, and if you think of the pixels on the screen as like paper–and remember that paper comes from wood. … yeah it’s a bit of a stretch, but.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. And the post you linked to–I had not seen it when it went up, and it is brilliant–so much food for thought (but no place to leave a comment?) I’ve shared it on Twitter with my older son, who’s very into thinking on those questions, and others may see it too (I hope!) and come read. I’m especially interested in musing on the fuel for the journey….

    Like

Fellowship & Fairydust

Inspiring Faith and Creativity and Exploring the Arts through a Spiritual Lens.

Rough fish in the river

Appreciating all the river has to offer

Planet Pailly

Where Science Meets Fiction

Prairie Yesteryear

Heritage Notes from the Prairie States

Andrea Lundgren

Book Coaching, Reviews, and Writing Tips

New England Nomad

All Things New England

Off the Shelf

Blog of the Marion E. Wade Center

Book Geeks Anonymous

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

Letters from the Edge of Elfland

entering the Maine metaphor

Wisdom from The Lord of the Rings

A weekly blog exploring the wisdom of The Lord of the Rings

the traveller's path

The blog of L.A. Smith, writer

The Fellowship of The King

Literary Expressions of Catholic Homeschoolers and Homeschool Graduates

sartorias

A topnotch WordPress.com site

asakiyume mita

A topnotch WordPress.com site

%d bloggers like this: